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Hari Ram Gupta Listings

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1 Hari Ram Gupta
History of the Sikhs: Vol. I: The Sikh Gurus 1469-1708
Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.; New Delhi, India; 2014; 8121502764 / 9788121502764; Reprint; Hardcover; New; New; 
History of the Sikhs is a five volume series dealing with all aspects-religious, philosophical, political, military, social, economic and cultural, and the contribution of Sikhism to world civilization, in particular to human rights, principles of liberty, equality and fraternity, and to the creed of democracy and secularism. The aim is to present a comprehensive view of the rise, growth and development of Sikh thought and action almost in every direction. The entire series is based on original contemporary sources in English, Gurmukhi, Marathi, Persian and Urdu known to exist in India and abroad. This first volume gives the story of Ten Masters who provided leadership to the downtrodden people of the Punjab both in religious and political fields for about two centuries. Their aim was to remove the bitterness that had persisted between the rulers and their subjects for the past five hundred years. They wished to create a new society based upon mutual brotherhood, and freedom of thought, expression and action. It was under the circumstances almost an impossible task. But there is nothing like a dream to create the future. Utopia today, flesh and blood tomorrow. Man's onward march requires that the heights around him should be ablaze with noble and glorious deeds of valour and self-sacrifice to serve as guiding lights. Such evolutionary and revolutionary models were furnished by Guru Arjan, Guru Tegh Bahadur, Guru Gobind Singh, and his four sons-Ajit Singh (18 years), Jujhar Singh (14 years), Zorawar Singh (8 years), and Fatah Singh (5 years)-as well as by their numerous disciples like Bhais Mati Das, Sati Das and Dayal Das. The main feature of this book are: A critical appraisement of Guru Nanak's Janam Sakhis, justification for celebrating Guru Nanak's birthday in November instead of in April, Guru Nanak's compositions, Mardana's death at Baghdad, how Amritsar developed into a Sikh centre, Guru Arjan's martyrdom, why Guru Hargobind took to militarism, Guru Har Rae's residence at Nahan, Hukam Namas of Guru Tegh Bahadur, Guru Gobind Singh's formula of five into five, his literary works and Hukam Namas, Emperor Bahadur Shah's pious fraud, eminent personalities and instructions, impact of Gurus'; teachings on Indian society, and why Jats became followers of Khatri Gurus. Printed Pages: 462 with 4 maps. 014781

Price: 21.95 USD
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2 Hari Ram Gupta
History of the Sikhs: Vol. II: Evolution of Sikh Confederacies
Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.; New Delhi, India; 2014; 8121502489 / 9788121502481; Reprint; Hardcover; New; New; 
History of the Sikhs planned as a five-volume survey aiming to present a comprehensive view of the rise, growth and development of Sikh thought and action in every direction. This volume Evolution of Sikh Confederacies 1708-69, is second in the series. The whole series is based on original contemporary sources in Persian, Marathi, Gurumukhi, Urdu, Hindi and English known to exist in India and abroad. The dominating theme of the second volume is the Mughal-Sikh and Sikh-Afghan contest for the lordship of the Punjab. The first period of the struggle between the Mughal Emperors and the Sikhs under Banda Bahadur lasted from 1709 to 1716, when Banda was executed. The second period of conflict was from 1716 to 1753 between the Sikhs and five Mughal viceroys of the Punjab-Abdus Samad Khan, his son Zakariya Khan, his sons Yahya Khan and Shahnawaz Khan and their cousin Muin-ul-Mulk, popularly called Mir Mannu. The third period extended from 1754 to 1768 in the strife against Ahmad Shah Durrani who had annexed the Punjab in 1752. He inflicted the heaviest blows on the Sikhs like the one struck on the Marathas at Panipat in 1761. Having sacrificed about two lakhs of young men in the whole struggle the Sikhs came out victorious. The two chapters at the end give an account of Mughlani Begam and Adina Beg Khan, the last Muslim viceroys of the Punjab. Printed Pages: 401 with 2 maps and 2 illustrations. 014782

Price: 19.25 USD
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3 Hari Ram Gupta
History of the Sikhs: Vol. III: Sikh Domination of the Mughal Empire
Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.; New Delhi, India; 2017; 8121502136 / 9788121502139; Reprint; Hardcover; New; New; 
History of the Sikhs is planned as a six volume survey aiming to present a comprehensive view of the rise, growth and development of Sikh thought and action in every direction. This volume Sikh Domination of the Mughal Empire 1764-1803 is third in the series. The whole series is based on original contemporary sources in Persian, Marathi, Gurumukhi, Urdu, Hindi and English known to exist in India and abroad. The dominating theme of the third volume is how and why the Sikhs missed numerous opportunities of establishing a Sikh State over the whole of Northern India. Najib-ud-daulah Rohilla, the first dictator of Delhi, and the vanquisher of Marathas and the Jats, publicly confessed having failed to subdue the Sikhs. Once he paid them a blackmail of eleven lakhs of rupees. His son and successor saved himself by embracing Sikhism. His widow and son lived in the Panjab on a Jagir granted by Jassa Singh Ramgarhia in his safe custody for seventeen years. The Mughal Emperor Shah Alam II (1759-1806) was prepared to place himself and his empire under Sikh protection. Najaf Khan, his prime minister, granted sovereign rights to the Sikhs. Mahadji Sindhia, the second dictator of the Mughal Empire, always maintained peace with them inspite of their frequent provocations. Lord Cornwallis, the British Governor-General in vain cajoled and coaxed them in order to secure the liberty from Sikh captivity of Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Stuart who was set free after ten months on receiving a ransom. The Jat rajas of Bharatpur, Rajput princes, Nawabs of Oudh, and the hill rajas, all troubled before them. As the Sikhs had risen to power and predominance from extreme poverty and penury, their imagination could not go outside their homeland acquisition of gold from the rich, rakhi from Zamindars and Kambh from artisans. Printed Pages: 422 with 3 maps. 030548

Price: 21.95 USD
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4 Hari Ram Gupta
History of the Sikhs: Vol. IV: The Sikh Commonwealth or Rise and Fall of the Misls
Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.; New Delhi, India; 2007; 8121501652 / 9788121501651; Reprint; Hardcover; New; New; 
History of the Sikhs is a five volume series which deals with all aspects-religious, philosophical, political, military, social, economic and cultural, and the contribution of Sikhism to world civilization, in particular to human rights, principles of liberty, equality and fraternity, and to the creed of democracy and secularism. The aim is to present a comprehensive view of the rise, growth and development of Sikh thought and action almost in every direction. The whole series is based on original contemporary sources in English, Gurmukhi, Marathi, Persian and Urdu known to exist in India and abroad. This fourth volume deals with the rise and fall of Sikh misls. In Sikh history this term was first used by Guru Gobind Singh in the battle Bhangani in 1688, when he organised his forces into eleven misls. Banda Bahadur adopted the same organisation of eleven divisions in the battle of Sarhind in May 1710. In 1734 Nawab Kapur Singh divided the Khalsa into Budha Dal and Taruna Dal, both comprising eleven groups. This division was permanently adopted at the formation of Dal Khalsa in 1748. The Phulkian states were not a Sikh misl. They developed as petty kingdoms from the beginning. They owed allegiance to the Mughals and Durranis, the enemies of their faith. They purchased titles from them. The Sikh misls never agreed to serve under Muslim masters. Lahna Singh Bhangi flatly rejected to become Ahmad Shah Durrani's viceroy of Panjab. Baghel Singh Karorasinghia controlled Delhi for nine months as an independent chief. He thrice turned down Emperor Shah Alam's firman appointing him governor of the Upper Ganga Doab. The Sikh misls dominated the whole country from river Indus to the Ganga, and from punch in Kashmir to the borders of Sind and Baluchistan. The Mughal Emperor, his prime ministers, Rohillas, Jats, Rajputs, Marathas, the British, hill rajas, and Durrani monarchs, all were terribly afraid of Sikh misls in spite of their complete disunity and mutual warfare. The misls in the western region were unceremoniously finished by Maharaja Ranjit Singh, and by the British Government in the eastern region. Printed Pages: 580 with 4 maps. 017518

Price: 14.25 USD
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5 Hari Ram Gupta
History of the Sikhs: Vol. V: The Sikh Lion of Lahore (Maharaja Ranjit Singh, 1799-1839)
Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.; New Delhi, India; 2007; 8121505151 / 9788121505154; Reprint; Hardcover; New; New; 
History of the Sikhs is a five volume survey aiming to present a comprehensive view of the rise, growth and development of Sikh thought and action in every direction. The present volume-The Sikh Lion of Lahore, 1799-1839-deals with Ranjit Singh. Ranjit Singh rose from the status of a petty chieftain to become the king of an empire extending from Gilgit and Tibet to the deserts of Sindh and from the Khyber Pass to the Satluj. He persuaded the turbulent Sikhs and Muslims to the Punjab to become the willing instruments of an expansionist policy which brought the Kashmiris and the Pathans of North-West Frontier and Baluchis of Multan province under his subjugation. His success was undoubtedly due to his ability to arouse the nascent sense of nationalism amongst his people and make them conscious that more important than their religion was the fact of their becoming a united people leading a harmonious life. The book consists of six parts, Part One deals with the campaigns and conquests of Maharaja Ranjit Singh. Part Two depicts his relation with neighbours and others. Part Three deals with his attitude towards secularism. Part Four describes Ranjit Singh's interest in establishing a cosmopolitan society in the Punjab and introducing an element of merriment in their humdrum life. Part Five deals with economic prosperity with special reference to the development of agriculture and growth of industry, trade and commerce. Part Six gives vivid portrait of the Sikh Lion of Lahore. Professor Gupta has based his work on Persian, Urdu, Gurmukhi, and English sources. He has drawn freely on the diaries and accounts of European travellers like Moorcroft, Sir Alexander Burnes, Masson, Fane, Emily Eden, etc. to create a memorable picture of the peasantry and brilliance of the Sikh kingdom at the height of its power and a lively portrait of one of the most colourful characters in the history of India. Printed Pages: 644. 031894

Price: 17.95 USD
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