Author:A.C. Burnell

Sort

Showing 1-4 of 4

On the Aindra School of Sanskrit Grammarian

By: A.C. Burnell

Price: $3.00

Publisher: Delhi, India, Bharatiya Vidya Prakashan: 1991

Seller ID: 103771

Condition: New


View more info

Elements of South Indian Paleography

By: A.C.Burnell

Price: $21.00

Publisher: New Delhi, India, Asian Educational Services: 1994

Edition: Reprint

Seller ID: 034666

ISBN: 8120606566

Condition: New


Printed pages:106 alongwith 30 plates and map. View more info

Hobson Jobson: A Glossary of Colloquial Anglo-Indian Words and Phrases, and of Kindred Terms, Etymological, Historical, Geographical, and Discursive

By: Henry Yule & A. C. Burnell (Authors) & William Crooke (Ed.)

Price: $26.20

Publisher: New Delhi, India, Motilal Banarsidass Publishers Pvt. Ltd.: 2013

Edition: First Edition

Seller ID: 102578

ISBN: 8178224429

Condition: New


Words of Indian origin have been insinuating themselves into English ever since the end of the reign of Elizabeth and the beginning of that of King James. When such terms as calico, chintz, and gingham had already effected a lodgment in English warehouses and shops, and were lying in wait for entrance into English literature. Such outlandish guests grew more frequent 120 years ago, when, soon after the middle of last century, the numbers of Englishmen in the Indian services, civil and military, expanded with the great acquisition of dominion then made by the company; and we meet them in vastly... View more info

Image for Hobson-Jobson: A Glossary of Colloquial Anglo-Indian Words and Phrases, and of Kindred Terms, Etymological, Historical, Geographical, and Discursive

Hobson-Jobson: A Glossary of Colloquial Anglo-Indian Words and Phrases, and of Kindred Terms, Etymological, Historical, Geographical, and Discursive

By: Henry Yule, A.C. Burnell (Authors) & William Crooke (Ed.)

Price: $23.95

Publisher: New Delhi, India, Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.: 2016

Edition: Reprint

Seller ID: 039766

ISBN: 8121501091

Condition: New


Words of Indian origin have been insinuating themselves into English eversince the end of the reign of Elizabeth and the beginning of that of King James, when such terms as calico, chintz, and gingham had long passed into English language and literature. Such foreign words started being used quite frequently 185 years ago when, soon after the middle of the last century the number of English men in Indian services, civil and military expanded with the great acquisition of dominion then made by the East India Company. Hobson-Jobson in original compilation was intended to deal with all that class... View more info